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Scope height

Beautiful Mulberry

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Iv always read/ been told you want to mount your optic close as you can to barrel for a variety of reasons.
I was messing around with my ballistics calculator and came across some interesting results. I’m currently using scope rings that are .75. I’m going to raise it .25 for a total of 1”. Before I do I wanted to see if or how much it would change my dope.

I entered .75”, 1”
Going from .75 to 1 there’s about 1/2 inch difference at 300y.
At a 1000y there’s about 2.3 inch difference according to the B.C if all goes well.

Could y’all expand my knowledge on why I would keep my height at .75 rather than 1”?
Only reason for the change is comfort.

IMG_5670.pngIMG_5671.pngIMG_5674.pngIMG_5675.png
 
We did this over in Optics. I have posted my opinions there. It’s an issue that’s not really an issue and doesn’t affect really much of anything unless your scope is a foot above the bore.
👇👇👇👇
 
We did this over in Optics. I have posted my opinions there. It’s an issue that’s not really an issue and doesn’t affect really much of anything unless your scope is a foot above the bore.
👇👇👇👇
I looked before posting about optics and didn’t find anything. I’ll go check it out.

If it need to be moved do it.
How do I get to the optics section other than the link you provided?
 
You’re correct.
I was only adding the difference in ring height to see how much of a difference there was. I did not add the total center to center in the BC app just rings.
I forgot to mention that in the beginning. It was is my head to write it out but I think my brain power experienced a glitch.
Hell I couldn’t even find the optic section
 
Two separate things that people conflate with scope height: Angular measurement - MOA/Mil and parallelism - two points at a fixed distance apart that run in straight lines equidistant from each other (in parallel).

1. Angular measurement is generally the relation of the bore to the aiming device (reticle) that allows you to image a target and a ballistic hold to put a projectile on a target. The further away/less capable ballistically, or environmentally (wind/movement) the greater the angle required for the ballistic solution. This isn't booktalk but me paraphrasing. I'm probably missing big words that some super shooter learned the other night and now uses over and over on his U-tub channel.

A 260 Rem 130gr with a .289 G7 BC at 2720 from an 18" barrel will have much less of an angle (MOA/Mil) required to engage a target distance wise and environmentally than a 175gr .308 with a .243 G7 BC at 2537 from an 18" barrel.

2. Scope over bore, the measured height of a scope centerline over a bore will be a fixed measurement which are parallel. At 0 meters it will be whatever it is and at 10,000 meters it will still be whatever it is.
That means a Scope with a centerline height over bore that is 2.75" at the source will still be 2.75" 5 thousand miles away. Or 10 million lightyears. Or 800 meters. The distance between the two will never change and will usually get lost in the error of the gun, shooter, ammo, and general accuracy of the gun at distance.

My default sight height in my Kestrel is 2.75. I never change it. My default on my Ballistic app is 1.5, I never change it. My ballistics solutions for identical loads on the app and Kestrel are almost exactly the same and I hit the same. I'd say that people who really worry about that usually don't have the ability to correct an error of 1/8" at 800m, the bullet diameter is larger than the error. JMO
 
Two separate things that people conflate with scope height: Angular measurement - MOA/Mil and parallelism - two points at a fixed distance apart that run in straight lines equidistant from each other (in parallel).

1. Angular measurement is generally the relation of the bore to the aiming device (reticle) that allows you to image a target and a ballistic hold to put a projectile on a target. The further away/less capable ballistically, or environmentally (wind/movement) the greater the angle required for the ballistic solution. This isn't booktalk but me paraphrasing. I'm probably missing big words that some super shooter learned the other night and now uses over and over on his U-tub channel.

A 260 Rem 130gr with a .289 G7 BC at 2720 from an 18" barrel will have much less of an angle (MOA/Mil) required to engage a target distance wise and environmentally than a 175gr .308 with a .243 G7 BC at 2537 from an 18" barrel.

2. Scope over bore, the measured height of a scope centerline over a bore will be a fixed measurement which are parallel. At 0 meters it will be whatever it is and at 10,000 meters it will still be whatever it is.
That means a Scope with a centerline height over bore that is 2.75" at the source will still be 2.75" 5 thousand miles away. Or 10 million lightyears. Or 800 meters. The distance between the two will never change and will usually get lost in the error of the gun, shooter, ammo, and general accuracy of the gun at distance.

My default sight height in my Kestrel is 2.75. I never change it. My default on my Ballistic app is 1.5, I never change it. My ballistics solutions for identical loads on the app and Kestrel are almost exactly the same and I hit the same. I'd say that people who really worry about that usually don't have the ability to correct an error of 1/8" at 800m, the bullet diameter is larger than the error. JMO
From center 2 center are you saying that yours measures 2.75?
 
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